Teaching

Research Experience For Undergraduates

 In the summer of 2021, Janet Page, Daniel Smolkin and myself mentored three REU students: Lillian McPherson, Monroe Stephenson, and Fuxiang Yang. 
 
This paper is a result of that project: 
Asymptotic Behavior of Differential Powers 
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Classes I have taught

 

At the University of Michigan: 

  • Fall 2020: Math 217, Linear Algebra (2 sections, IBL)

  • Winter 2021: Math 217, Linear Algebra (2 sections, IBL)

  • Fall 2021: Math 217, Linear Algebra (2 sections, IBL) 

  • Spring 2022: Math 412, Abstract Algebra (2 sections, IBL)

  • Fall 2022: Math 412, Abstract Algebra (2 sections, IBL)

At the University of Utah: 

  • Number Theory

  • Discrete Math

  • Linear Algebra

  • Applied Statistics

  • Introduction to Statistics

  • Precalculus

  • Business Algebra

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Inquiry Based Learning
 

All of the classes I have taught at the University of Michigan, and some that I taught at the University of Utah, have been inquiry based, which is a type of active learning. 

 

IBL classes have students work on exercises together in groups. There is very minimal lecturing from the instructor. Instead, the instructor checks student work, makes sure the group is functioning harmoniously,  and manages the pace in the classroom.   

There is evidence indicating that active learning is more effective for many students than traditional lecture based learning: Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics.  

Interestingly, students don't always have an accurate idea of how much they learn through different modalities! Measuring actual learning versus feeling of learning in response to being actively engaged in the classroom.

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